We’ve detailed the forward momentum generated by the San Diego Sports Collective on our site. Led by Ed Clancy, the collective has been focusing on educating and advocating for pedestrian safety through the Rider Safety Visibility initiative. Known as RSV, the focus is improving the experience and safety of cycling by increasing the visibility of pedestrians to cars. As more and more pedestrians, cyclists especially, fall victim to automobiles drifting into bike lanes, the focus on visibility has come to the forefront as the best tool to prevent rider fatalities. To this end, Clancy has brought together a diverse group of interested advocates for an ongoing series of summits that have helped bring awareness and push forward the agenda of improving rider visibility and safety.

The most recent meeting took place this past month, with a showcase of the technology that is aiding the visibility campaign. Speaking at the summit and representing the City of Oceanside, Deputy Mayor Chuck Lowery spoke about the improvements to infrastructure for pedestrians that has taken place in Oceanside.

Howard Lagrange, the Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator for the City of Oceanside, has worked to develop and designate bicycle routes throughout the city alongside signage and maps to inform and educate. His work with Oceanside is a model for other cities to replicate, creating a bike-friendly network of pathways that make sense for both cyclists and non-cycling citizens. Howard Lagrange, the Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator for the City of Oceanside, has worked to develop and designate bicycle routes throughout the city alongside signage and maps to inform and educate. His work with Oceanside is a model for other cities to replicate, creating a bike-friendly network of pathways that make sense for both cyclists and non-cycling citizens.

Danny Van Haute, team director of the storied Jelly Belly professional cycling team was on hand to pledge his support of the RSV initiative. He also surprised the group by announcing that he will be contractually requiring his team riders to use day-time running lights while training in 2018. Though most professional cyclists would frown on additional rules constraining their training, anything that makes sharing the road with cars safer is a welcome addition. For more information on RSV and how you can bring the program to your hometown, visit ridersafetyvisibility.com