This Ofrenda is a tribute to fallen bicyclists. The centerpiece is an 8-foot sculpture of a ghost bike rider. At the foot of the sculpture are the elements of nature – earth, wind, water, and fire in a bicycle twist. More than 700 bicyclists are killed each year in crashes with motor vehicles. That’s 2 blessed lives a day. The majority of injuries that lead to death were head traumas, thus proving the importance of wearing helmets. Only 21 states require that young riders wear helmets…

The center of downtown burst with brightly colored posters and flags flying above buildings, calling our attention to the Dia de Los Muertos celebration. Amidst the electricity, a sparkling white sculpture stood in stillness. A stark white sugar skeleton in a custom kit and glittering orange helmet, grinned widely. The sculpture comfortably rested on an equally bright white bike, a ghost bike, riding through a garden of clay Marigolds and sunbeams. Photographs of fallen bicyclists decorated the alter, and fruit and granola nestled underneath the frames as offerings to honor lost loved ones – a cyclist’s touch on the traditions of the holiday. Under the Ofrenda (Spanish for offering) strangers and families share a silent moment of reflection. Next to the sculpture – a call to action. A corresponding poster read, “More than 700 bicyclists are killed each year in crashes with motor vehicles. That’s 2 blessed lives a day. The majority of injuries that lead to death were head traumas, thus proving the importance of wearing helmets…” As a tribute to the fallen bicyclists, we’ve added the poster of the Ofrenda so that their memory may live on.

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